1. bandschic said: Marlow in England please

    At 40 meters above sea level, Marlow is safe… for now.

     

  2. puku666 said: kolkata, West Bengal, India

    It would only take 8 meters to put the major city of Kolkata under water. Yikes.

     

  3. disorderedthinking said: Rockville, MD, 20851

    You’d need almost 100 m of sea level rise to begin creeping into Rockville. 

     

  4. An update on requests.

    Hello DYT fans!

    Due to the massive backlog of asks (there’s over 1000 requests in the queue) we will no longer be taking requests, however, you’re still more than welcome to create your own #DrownYourTown images and submit them to the site. I will continue to work (slowly) through the backlog nd may reopen requests once the queue is clear.

    How to #DrownYourTown: a step by step guide to modeling sea level rise in Google Earth

    ~Andrew

     

  5. moosecase said: Any chance you can add Canadian cities to #DrownYourTown?

    #DrownYourTown already covers the entire world.

     

  6. outlawfirefighter said: I would like to see Odenton Maryland. the zip code is 21113

    Odenton has some elevation behind it. The entirety of the Antarctic ice sheets would have to collapse to get the requisite 60 meters of sea level rise.

     

  7. cysbun1 said: Mesa, AZ

    There’s not enough water in the world to flood Mesa, Arizona, but since you asked, we did it anyway. 378 meters of sea level rise. 

     
  8. Last week, we were treated to a new report revealing many US National Monuments were at risk from climate change and sea level rise. This week, we’re going to take a look at some of our national heritage that could be lost beneath the rising tides. It’s #DownYourHistory week on #DrownYourTown!

     
  9. Last week, we were treated to a new report revealing many US National Monuments were at risk from climate change and sea level rise. This week, we’re going to take a look at some of our national heritage that could be lost beneath the rising tides. It’s #DownYourHistory week on #DrownYourTown!

     

  10. Exploring new models to fund ocean science and outreach

    This announcement has been posted across all Southern Fried Science sister sites. If you’ve enjoyed Drown Your Town, please take a moment to read it.


    It’s an open secret that I’ve been struggling over the last few years to keep Southern Fried Science growing while making it financially sustainable. Ocean outreach matters, because the oceans matter. Many of of believes that protecting the oceans is the most important thing we’ll ever do. Our survival depends on a healthy ocean. So we write about overfishing and shark finning, climate change and ocean acidification, mining and trawling and bycatch runoff. And, since, as St. Jacques once said, “people protect what they love”, we do what we can to make people love the ocean as much as we do.

    For most of its existence, Southern Fried Science and my other outreach projects have been funded by science. Research grants, outreach fellowships, even graduate student stipends went towards keeping our servers running. But science funding is in crisis, and that model is no longer valid. In a disturbing reversal, today, income from outreach related work–selling articles, consulting for NGO’s, running workshops–is being used to fund my scientific research. Neither model is viable.

    It’s time to try something new.

    Enter Patreon, a crowdfunding service geared towards artists and other content creators. Unlike Kickstarter, which is designed to fund single projects, Patreon is designed to provide a continuous source of funding to creators through either monthly or by-work subscriptions. Subscribers, or Patrons, get access to bonus content and other rewards through a tiered donation system. With the exception of articles that appear in certain periodicals, almost everything I do for ocean outreach is free and ad-free, and we like it that way. The ocean is too important to be trapped behind a paywall. Patreon allows us to keep our content free while providing an incentive for our biggest fans to help support us.

    I believe that the Patreon model could provide a viable source of revenue for my ongoing, growing, ocean outreach empire. This week,I launched a Patreon campaign. To be clear and transparent, this campaign is specifically to provide funding for me, Andrew Thaler, who as the Editor-in-chief of Southern Fried Science, bears full responsibility for both financial and technical support of this website. It also means that the campaign encompasses not just support for this website, but for other outreach projects that I lead, including #DrownYourTown, Deep Sea Fauna… with Googly Eyes, the OpenCTD, art projects like the Sea Leveler, everything about exploding whales, and, most important, ongoing scientific research. Is all this content combined worth $3 a month to you?

    And there are rewards; fantastic rewards ranging from access to behind the scenes content and discussion to full-scale consulting services. The one I’m most excited about is the box of ocean curiosities. Have you ever though “gee, wouldn’t it be great is a rogue deep-sea ecologist sent me a hand-picked box of ocean curiosities”? If so, than you should definitely check out my Patreon page.

    This is a fascinating time to be a scientist. With science funding in flux and academia undergoing its own identity crisis, the time is ripe to explore new models of funding science, or funding outreach, and, as neither can survive without the other, of drawing these two worlds even more tightly together. Patreon is an experiment. Is it a viable path to funding independent scientists? I don’t know, but I’m going to find out.

    Visit my Patreon page here. 

     
  11. Last week, we were treated to a new report revealing many US National Monuments were at risk from climate change and sea level rise. This week, we’re going to take a look at some of our national heritage that could be lost beneath the rising tides. It’s #DownYourHistory week on #DrownYourTown!

     

  12. thatfishee said: Can You Drown San Juan, Puerto Rico, Please? :o

    5 meters of sea level rise would be very bad news for San Juan!

     

  13. tarheelbargains said: 27910

    It’s going to take at least 15 meters of sea level rise to begin getting Ahoskie, NC wet.

     

  14. bullyrabbit said: Chicago please!

    At 185 meters above sea level, Chicago is safe from catastrophic sea level rise. But her it is anyway!

     

  15. juiceboxez said: Sydney,Nova Scotia, Canada

    Here’s Sydney with 4 meters of sea level rise (from mid-tide).